Thursday, May 31, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Palliative Care Conference kicks off

Participants learn the intricacies in making people comfortable in their final days




Mike Harlos (right) speaks about considerations for clinical care at the Saskatchewan Hospice Palliative Care provincial conference at the Heritage Inn. Fellow speaker Fred Nelson (left) sits by before he speaks to the participants as well. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy






By Lisa Goudy

Communication skills, consideration for clinical care and psychosocial support in the final days is important for professionals to learn more about.

“When most people think about — as physicians or nurses or other clinicians — helping someone at the end of life, my experience is the two things that are most intimidating to that doctor, for example, are the medications that we use, do I know the drugs and even more intimidating, what do I say?” said Mike Harlos, medical director of adult and pediatric palliative care for the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority and professor and section head of palliative medicine at the University of Manitoba.


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Additional and full comments

Sylvia Keall, local conference chairperson: “The goal is to increase people’s knowledge and awareness of palliative care, of what the needs are for people who are dying, what the most cutting edge medications and symptom control is all about,” said Keall. “It’s also about helping people with the spiritual aspects and the psychosocial, the emotional because when an individual’s dying it’s not just about physical comfort. It’s more than that. And the goal is always to try and get the body comfortable enough so that that person can then deal with any other things in their life that they would like to put some closure to perhaps before they actually die.”
 

Fred Nelson, psychosocial program specialist with the Palliative Care Program with the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority: “I think we still are a death denying society and I think the whole area of hospice and palliative care has been a developing field over the years. I think that we’re much better at helping people living more comfortable and to live their life as much as they can until they do die and I think anything that’s going to help people think about things and have some more ideas and develop their skills in doing that is a good thing," said Nelson.


"I hope they take away some opportunity to reflect on their own work and an opportunity to think about if anything we said kind hat resonated with them that makes some sense in terms of ‘Oh, I never thought of that’ or ‘Oh, I’d like to try and do that,'" said Nelson.

Mike Harlos: “As physicians and nurses, you don’t get training necessarily in the right thing to say so we rely on the same thing everybody else does, which is what’s your life experience, how did your family talk about death and dying and what have you seen and to be honest, most of our life experiences are pretty empty when it comes to talking about death and dying. It’s not your typical dinner table conversation or party conversation,” said Mike Harlos.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Service Canada Centre for Youth goes online only

By Lisa Goudy

The Service Canada Centre for Youth will be completely online this year.

“Over the years, there’s been a number of students using the Service Canada Centres for Youth,” said Ray Boughen, member of parliament for Palliser. “That’s decreased over the past few years just because more information is available on computers … The computer’s taken over.”



All job postings and other information for student employment can be found online at youth.gc.ca

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: SIAST and U of R will offer face-to-face classes

By Lisa Goudy

Starting this fall, teachers from the University of Regina will be coming down to teach a few face-to-face classes.

In a partnership with the SIAST Palliser campus in Moose Jaw, professors from the U of R will come to SIAST in Moose Jaw to teach classes.


For more information about classes and programs, visit www.uregina.ca/cce.

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Struggling to live with a terminal illness

By Lisa Goudy

Kayla McCurdy, 24, has struggled to live from day to day ever since she was diagnosed with a terminal illness.

“We help her as much as we possibly can,” said McCurdy’s mother-in-law Cheryl Hetherington. “She struggles ... she’s a real trooper though.”


Additional information

Tickets for the dessert theatre at Mortlach Hall are $18 each and it starts at 6:30 p.m. for people to get dessert. The play starts at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased by calling Hetherington at 690-4788 or her brother Ian at 681-7772. 

Learn more about diffuse scleroderma

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Grade 8 students skype with 'The Bite of the Mango' authors

By Lisa Goudy


King George Elementary School students Chloe Peterson (left), Max Pilsworth and Britnee Dunlop were among the students who skyped with the authors of the memoir, The Bite of the Mango. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy
Reading about someone whose hands were cut off and seeing that same person are two very different things.     
      
“She loses her hands in the book and stuff and has to try and learn how to use new hands,” said King George Elementary School Grade 8 student Max Pilsworth. “It was pretty cool seeing her using her phone and her laptop and stuff with just her arms and no hands.”


Grade 8 students skype the authors of 'The Bite of the Mango.' Photo courtesy Dana Ansell, Prairie South School Division
Pilsworth was one of nine students who used Skype to talk with Mariatu Kamara and Susan McClelland on Friday, authors of the bookThe Bite of the Mango. The book is Kamara’s first hand account of what happened to her growing up in Sierra Leone.


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Grade 8 students speak with Mariatu Kamara via Skype. Photo courtesy Dana Ansell, PSSD




Additional, full comment from Lynn Kirk, student support teacher at King George Elementary School


Photo courtesy Dana Ansell, PSSD
“She writes really well as far as its not disgustingly graphic, but it is disturbing because of the situation so I wouldn’t suggest it for kids under Grade 8 unless they’re very very mature readers, but above grade 8 everybody should be reading this book and I mean right up to 95. 

"It really is that important that we didn’t know this was going on and I was raising my kids at the time and I didn’t know this was going on in Africa. It’s digusting. It’s sad," said Kirk.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Fewer teams registered in Relay for Life


By Lisa Goudy
Although fewer teams are registered this year than anticipated, event organizers are still excited for Friday’s Relay for Life.


Additional comment from Gaye Stewart, unit manager at the Canadian Cancer Society:

"I think some people weren't happy that we were going indoors and some of the new teams were happy that we were going indoors," said Stewart. 

Friday, May 25, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: New salon for seniors, special needs offers affordability

Danielle Hubenick, co-owner and founder of Danielle's Salon. Submitted photo



By Lisa Goudy


Danielle Humenick has always wanted to follow in her mother’s footsteps and be a hairdresser.


Now a married mother of two, Humenick opened up a local salon on April 3 — Danielle’s Salon, at 12-610 Second Ave. N.E. with accessibility for seniors, people with special needs and little children.


Read more

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Lisa's Corner: 3-D feature films are no longer a novelty

By Lisa Goudy

While trying to find inspiration to write this column, I stumbled across a news item that announced that the release date to the sequel to the movie G.I. Joe will be delayed for nine months to convert the whole movie into 3-D.

G.I. Joe Retaliation was scheduled to come out on June 29 this year, but now it won’t come out until March 29, 2013. There was little I could do to stop my jaw from dropping a little. Whether I was looking forward to seeing this movie or not, I’m slightly appalled by such a long delay just for making the movie 3-D.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Upcoming A-Moose-ing Race fundraising for a good cause



Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: CP union employees go on strike


CP union employees stand on strike outside the old train 
station on Main Street.

Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy

By Lisa Goudy

Canadian Pacific (CP) Railway union employees walked off the job on Wednesday.

Between 30 and 80 pickets, broken up into five shifts with five-hour rotations, stood outside the old train station at the bottom of Main Street beginning at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday after negotiations before the midnight deadline with CP fell through.










CP union employees stand on strike outside the old train station on Main Street. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy




















Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Race and auction to support Canadian Tire Jumpstart

By Lisa Goudy

Moose Jaw Canadian Tire and other local businesses are doing their part to support kids in the community.

On Saturday, Double Shift Conditioning will hold a race, run and walk at 8:30 a.m. at Spring Creek and a silent auction at the store on Main Street at 1:50 p.m. the same day with all proceeds going to Canadian Tire Jumpstart, said Krystal Chow, the main organizer of Jumpstart.


More information on Jumpstart can be found here.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Rocking out for needy animals

Free concert to support the humane society

By Lisa Goudy

Local band Finding Penny and six other bands will rock out for animals in need.

On Saturday, at the Crescent Park Amphitheatre, the Rock the Amp concert will take place from 1 to 9 p.m. as a fundraiser for the Moose Jaw Humane Society.






Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Buffalo Pound has good opening weekend

By Lisa Goudy


Despite the rain on Friday, Buffalo Pound Provincial Park had a good opening weekend.


“It was busy, but quiet,” said Dave Bjarnason, the park supervisor. “There were no issues with the alcohol ban …  only a few minor warnings.”


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Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Dog jog tropics in Wakamow Valley Park

By Lisa Goudy


On June 10, Wakamow Valley Park is going to get tropical.


The 17th annual Dog Jog fundraiser for the Moose Jaw Humane Society will begin at 2 p.m. at the Kinsmen-Wellesley Picnic Shelter and will have a Hawaiian theme.


Read more


Minimum entry fees are $25 per person, $50 per couple and $100 per team of four or more. Pledge forms, complete with rules and regulations, are available at the shelter and can be downloaded online at www.mjhs.ca. Before collecting pledges, participants are asked to call the shelter for an official registration number at 692-1517.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Cruising on the highway

2012 Corolla offers reliability, safety and comfort

By Lisa Goudy
The 2012 Corolla S offers a sportier look. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy

The 2012 Toyota Corolla rides smoothly and comfortably, with good gas mileage and other options to maximize safety, accessibility and fuel economy at a reasonable price.

“With the Toyota Corolla, everything’s easy to get to,” said Fraser Tolmie, a product advisor at Taylor Toyota Moose Jaw. “There’s no hidden switches or dials. You’ve got your cruise control at your fingertips.”

Tolmie said Corollas come in four packages — the CE model, which is the base model, the LE model, which has aluminum rims, the S model, which is the sport package and the XRS, which is more of a performance car because of its larger engine.

He added the focus is on the CE, LE and S packages because those models have 1.8 litre, 4-cylinder engine with “variable valve timing with an intelligence engine.” He said the prices for a mid-range car like the CE start at approximately $21,000.

“It’s a proven engine that is very reliable and the feedback we get from our clients is that they’re extremely happy with the Toyota Corollas,” said Tolmie.

The interior. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy
He said for maintenance under the hood, all the necessary features are easily accessible to do regular maintenance. For instance, Tomlie said it’s easy to change the battery without having to move a lot around and to get a boost if needed. Accessing the radiator fluid, washer fluid and brakes are equally as simple.

The Corolla is rated on the highway by the Canadian government for 15 miles per gallon for speeds between 77 and 97 kilometres per hour, said Tomlie, which attests to its good mileage and fuel economy.

The S package is the sport package and includes several luxurious extras. The sport features a wind spoiler on the back of the car with lower skirting, aluminum rims and a sun roof included in the aerodynamic package. The sport model also has a leather wrapped steering wheel.

Corollas come complete with a six-inch audio system with AM/FM, CD/MP3/WMA player and six speakers. They also offer an outlet so that an iPod or iPhone can be plugged into the car to play music, as well as being Bluetooth compatible. The Bluetooth can also be used to stream music. All of those can be controlled with buttons on the steering wheel.

Other accessories include all-season mats secured onto the floor of the vehicle. The Corollas are designed for acceleration so it’s easy to pass someone on the highway if necessary.

For more information, see the May 19 edition of the Times-Herald. 

The Specs

The engine. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy
Corolla S

• 132 hp, 1.8 litre, 4-cylinder
• DOHC, 16-valve, dual VVT-i-engine
• Standard 5-speed manual or optional 4-speed automatic transmission
• Ventilated front disc and rear drum brakes
• AM/FM CD/MP3/WMA player, 6 speakers, auxiliary input jack
• Active front headrests
• Front bucket seats• Rear spoiler, full skirt package
• 60/40 split rear bench seat with fold-down seat back
• Illuminated entry with fade-out dome lamp
• Dual heated power adjustable mirrors
• Available leather seat surfaces and heated driver and front passenger seats
• Star Safety System
• Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Traction Control (TRAC), Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS), Electronic Brake-Force Distribution (EBD), Brake Assist (BA) and Smart Stop Technology (SST)7.4 city/5.6 highway fuel consumption (L/100 km)

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Volunteers needed for Y's Pie in the Eye

By Lisa Goudy

More volunteers are needed to meet this year’s goal for the YMCA’s eighth annual Pie in the Eye fundraiser on May 24.

“The more volunteers we have, the more money we raise,” said Corinne Damaskie, YMCA’s communications and funds development co-ordinator. “We can always use more.”




Pie orders can be phoned in the day of, or preferably, pre-ordered for May 24 by calling either 692-0688 or 692-1211. To volunteer, contact Damaskie at 692-5448.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Provincial palliative conference to be held in Moose Jaw


A provincial palliative conference is coming to Moose Jaw.

The Saskatchewan Hospice Palliative Care Association (SHPCA)’s annual conference will take place at the Heritage Inn from May 30 to June 2.


Friday, May 18, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Lisa's Corner: Satellite vs. cable: The same only different

By Lisa Goudy

Ever since I moved to Moose Jaw last month, I’ve been a subscriber to SaskTel Max. This was a change for me because back in Regina, I had a dish with Bell for satellite television. The last time I had cable was a long time ago and I always remembered not liking it very much. This dislike was heightened when I first had experience with a satellite dish.

So naturally when I decided to sign up for SaskTel Max because of a promotion, I wasn’t really sure what to expect from cable.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Library introduces summer adult programming

By Lisa Goudy

For the first time, Moose Jaw Public Library is planning a full summer of adult programming.

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Federal gov't launches ‘Canada Brand’ food promotion

Palliser MP Ray Boughen announces the 'Canada Brand' 
initiative at South Hill Fine Foods on Friday to promote 
and identify Canadian food products. 
Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy

 By Lisa Goudy

Consumers are going to have an easier time identifying Canadian food products.

At the South Hill Fine Foods store in Moose Jaw on Friday, Palliser member of Parliament Ray Boughen announced a new initiative, Canada Brand, which is promoting Canadian food products on behalf of Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz.


For more information on the different types of Canadian content statements go to www.eatCanadian.ca

For more information on the initiative, see www.marquecanadabrand.agr.gc.ca.

Dana Lougheed speaks at the announcement of the 'Canada Brand' initiative at South Hill Fine Foods on Friday. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy



(From left to right): Ray Boughen, Dana Lougheed and Harry Watson, president of Triple4Advertising pose after the announcement of the 'Canada Brand' initiative at South Hill Fine Foods on Friday.  Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy

 

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Moose Jaw Band and Choral Festival helpful to performers


Deborah Nelson directs her Cantate Senior Choir at the Moose Jaw Band and Choral Festival on Thursday. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy   
By Lisa Goudy


Voices filled the air in Zion United Church on Thursday, which was the last day of the 63rd annual Moose Jaw Band and Choral Festival.


“It was really great this year. The adjudicators were especially wonderful,” said 17-year-old Judith Bjorndahl, a member of the Cantate Senior Choir from Regina. Cantate is a community youth choir.


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Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Snowbirds perform season opener show in Moose Jaw

By Lisa Goudy

***The story also appeared in other publications, such as the Regina Leader-Post and the Saskatoon StarPhoenix, See below for more details.***



Snowbird 7 sits on the tarmac after the first flight demonstration of the 2012 season. The plane is flown by Captain Iain Cummings, from St. Catherines, Ont, who flies in the Outer Left Wing position.
Times-Herald photo by Aaron Stuckel.
Daring maneuvers in front of a crowd of family and friends in 30 Celsius weather kicked off the 2012 show season of the Canadian Forces Snowbirds on Wednesday afternoon at 15 Wing Moose Jaw.

“It was challenging conditions for us. It was the hottest day that we’ve flown this year so that makes the jet quite a bit underpowered compared to how it normally is,” said Capt. Brent Handy, the No. 9 opposing solo. “It was good training opportunity plus that’s actually our first time to fly over the air fields here in Moose Jaw.”


Audience goes wild for Snowbirds

For Rebecca Handy, she could see the exact same Snowbird show again and again.

“It always seems like it’s the first time I’ve seen it every time I see it because it’s just so awesome,” said Handy. “Everything they do is amazing so they could’ve done the same thing they’ve always done and it would be amazing.” 

Handy was one of many family, friends and members of the Canadian Air Force who sat and watched the show opener at 15 Wing Moose Jaw. 

Handy said she particularly loved the solos. It was her husband’s first show, but she said seeing is different than hearing about the different maneuvers. 

“I’ve heard a lot about what they’ve been doing with their practices and stuff, but I hadn’t actually seen it,” said Handy. “It was pretty awesome.” 

Kristen Wiebe thought the timing for the show couldn’t have been better.

“I thought it was excellent. They had a perfect day for it as well,” said Wiebe, who was there supporting her father, Cpt. Gregg Wiebe, No. 4 first line astern. “All the different maneuvers, they’re so breathtaking. It really has you on the edge of your seat.” 

Her favourite moves were the Kaleidoscope, the Corkscrew, the Maple Leaf Split and a new move, the Inukshuk.

“It seems very appropriate,” said Wiebe. “(It was) very Canadian.”

- Goudy

The same story also appeared in variations in other publications:



Daring manoeuvres in front of a crowd of family and friends in 30C weather kicked off the 2012 show season of the Canadian Forces Snowbirds on Wednesday afternoon at 15 Wing Moose Jaw.

"It was challenging conditions for us. It was the hottest day that we've flown this year, so that makes the jet quite a bit underpowered compared to how it normally is," said Capt. Brent Handy, the No. 9 opposing solo. "It was good training opportunity plus that's actually our first time to fly over the airfields here in Moose Jaw."

Handy, a first-time pilot with the Snowbirds in 2012, said the training is normally done in Mossbank and flying in front of family and friends was an "added perceived pressure." The Snowbirds are in their 42nd season.

Approximately three quarters into the show, Snowbird No. 7 experienced a minor technical problem and measures were taken to get the plane on the ground before resuming the show.

"Seven hit a bird on the leading edge so we stopped the show and that's what we would normally do," said Maj. Wayne Mott, the 2012 team lead who flies the No. 1 jet. "It's a dent on the leading edge. The guys will take it off and put a new part on - you wouldn't even know that it was dented in that airplane if you didn't hear the noise of the bird hitting it."

Mott said having a jet missing can affect the dynamics of the show, but changes are discussed over the air to adjust for having a jet missing. He said he believed they put on a good opening show, even though it was a bit bumpy in the air.

Capt. Padruig MacIntosh, No. 3 inner left wing, added that several new moves have been added this year, such as the Concord Combo, which he said is a "roll followed by a loop."

"We're pretty excited to get that in the opener this year," said MacIntosh.

The Snowbirds will hold approximately 58 performances in 39 locations across Canada and the United States. Their next show is in Winnipeg on May 19 and they'll return to Moose Jaw for a show on July 7. Travel destinations include places as far away as Illinois, Minnesota and Florida.

"I've never been way up north to Whitehorse, Nunavut and all that so I'm pretty pumped for that," said MacIntosh. "My experience so far has been like a dream."

For Handy, it'll be a new experience travelling across North America during the summer.

"It'll be a summer of highs and lows, travelling to some really neat places and meeting all kinds of really neat people, but the lows are obviously being away from your family for such a long time," said Handy.


Daring manoeuvres in front of a crowd of family and friends in 30C weather kicked off the 2012 show season of the Canadian Forces Snowbirds at 15 Wing Moose Jaw.
"It was challenging conditions for us. It was the hottest day that we've flown this year, so that makes the jet quite a bit underpowered compared to how it normally is," Capt. Brent Handy, the No. 9 opposing solo, said Wednesday. "It was good training opportunity plus that's actually our first time to fly over the airfields here in Moose Jaw."

Handy, a first-time pilot with the Snowbirds in 2012, said the training is normally done in Mossbank and flying in front of family and friends was an "added perceived pressure." The Snowbirds are in their 42nd season.

About three-quarters into the show, Snowbird No. 7 experienced a minor technical problem and measures were taken to get the plane on the ground before resuming the show.

"Seven hit a bird on the leading edge so we stopped the show and that's what we would normally do," said Maj. Wayne Mott, the 2012 team lead who flies the No. 1 jet. "It's a dent on the leading edge. The guys will take it off and put a new part on ... you wouldn't even know that it was dented in that airplane if you didn't hear the noise of the bird hitting it."

Capt. Padruig MacIntosh, No. 3 inner left wing, said several new moves have been added this year, such as the Concord Combo, which he said is a "roll followed by a loop."
 
"We're pretty excited to get that in the opener this year," said MacIntosh.

The Snowbirds will hold about 58 performances in 39 locations across Canada and the United States.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Getting up to speed on Ag news


Agriculture Minister Bob Bjornerud speaks at Moose Jaw breakfast

Agriculture Minister Bob Bjornerud speaks to a crowd at the Heritage Inn at a breakfast Tuesday morning. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy
By Lisa Goudy

Bruce Ellergodt believes it’s important to be up to speed on what’s happening in Saskatchewan.

“All industries affect other industries,” said Ellergodt, owner of Prairie Window Fashions and Magnetsigns in Moose Jaw. “The ag (agriculture) industry in Moose Jaw is important to my businesses and the success of what’s happening in the ag industry is going to spill over into the success of my businesses.”

Monday, May 14, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: More teams encouraged to register in Relay for Life


With a new location and entertainment booked, the only things needed for the 11th annual Relay for Life fundraiser are more teams.

“We’re encouraging more people to come out and get their team registered,” said event chairwoman Doris Dunphy. “We still have a little ways to go.”


Canadian Cancer Society website

Friday, May 11, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Celebrating her first real Mother's Day


Denine Neuls holds her eight week old son, Kieran. Submitted photo.

By Lisa Goudy

For Denine Neuls, Mother’s Day has a new meaning.

“I’m a lot more excited now,” said Neuls, who gave birth to her first child, Kieran, eight weeks ago. “I was excited before, but in a different way. I wanted to help my mom and get her supper or lunch or whatever we would do for her and a little gift here and there, but now it’s like it’s going to be my day too … it’s almost like a birthday with more glory.”

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Lisa's Corner: Mother’s Day: More than just the presents


By Lisa Goudy

What are you getting your mother for Mother’s Day? I’d be surprised if the majority of people could honestly say that question had not been circling in their minds this past week. With Mother’s Day on Sunday, it’s become custom that we get something for our mothers on this special day. Not to mention how the news has been constantly streaming in our ears since statistics came in showing that men spend more than women for Mother’s Day.

But I don’t think that’s what Mother’s Day is really about. Sure, the gifts for your mother are a nice way to show your appreciation. Firstly, I think you should appreciate your mother (and father because the same argument applies to Father’s Day) every day of the year, not just this one day out of 365.

That said, since it’s a common tendency for people to take other people for granted, highlighting your appreciation on this one day is a prudent reminder of how precious our mothers really are.


Read more

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Moose Jaw Times-Herald: Building a better future for our children

Clyde Hertzman speaks about the state of early childhood development at the Imagine Our Future national conference on Wednesday night. Times-Herald photo by Lisa Goudy
By Lisa Goudy

Early childhood development is central to maintaining health, as demonstrated during the opening night of the Imagine Our Future national conference at Mosaic Place.

“The early years are very, very important for us to take seriously as a society,” said Clyde Hertzman, a professor in the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia and the director of the Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP). 



Additional comments

“Early human development influences outcomes across the entire life,” said Clyde Hertzman. “By the end of the second decade of life, what happened in those first five years is influencing risks of school failure, unwanted teenage pregnancy and early criminality, despite all the things that come afterwards.”

“The conference is about looking at the importance of the early years and not only the early development, but the effect of parenting and families on that development and looking at what we can do to make a difference for the future. The future of these children and the future of the economy and general health and well-being of our city, our province and our country,” said Christine Boyczuk.