Monday, November 28, 2011

Leader-Post: A family affair at Agribition

Agribition week is a family affair for the Moens.



The Moen family (left to right) J.B., Brent, Makayla, Sandra and Buck pose for a family portrait at the Canadian Western Agribition on Friday, Nov. 25, 2011. Kashtin Moen is also part of the family but was unavailable for the photo.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post


Additional Comments from Sandra Moen

"It’s great fun to come down and see everybody and the calibre of the rodeo and stuff is so nice and good quality stock," said Sandra Moen. "From a parent’s standpoint, it’s nice to see the kids there for each other and supporting each other.

"You see so many families that their kids are all fighting and squabbling and can’t stnad to be together where I look at mine and they’re right there helping each other and even when the boys were riding agaiinst each other, they’re still righ thtere helping each other."

Three weeks after being kicked by a horse in the head, Buck was also struck by lightning.

“God has big plans for him because he should’ve been dead not once, but twice,” said Sandra.

The Moen family - J.B., Brent, Makayla, Sandra and Buck, left to right - pose for a family portrait at the Canadian Western Agribition on Friday.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Leader-Post, Leader-Post
 

Leader-Post: Feds put up cash to boost Canada's agricultural profile

Marty Seymour, left, CEO and general manager of the Canadian
Western Agribition, and Gerry Ritz, Federal Agricultural Minister,
tour the barns at the Canadian Western Agribition.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post


The federal government will make investments totalling $750,000 to livestock and forage sectors to increase foreign deals and competitiveness.

Read more


Related article: Gerry Ritz denies 'expropriating' millions from farmers


Additional Comments



Marty Seymour, left, CEO and general manager of the Canadian
Western Agribition, and Gerry Ritz, Federal Agricultural
Minister, tour the barns at the Canadian Western Agribition
on Friday, Nov. 25, 2011.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post

Gerry Ritz, the federal agriculture minister: "I had an opportunity to come in through the barns and of course that’s always good. (There was) a lot of activity down there (Friday) morning, everybody with high hopes of bringing home that ribbon certainly it’s interesting to watch all the different breeds compete. They all bring a certain characteristic to the barn and to the sales ring that people all over the world are asking for.
 
"It’s becoming easier and easier to sell great Canadian genetics out there on the world stage. The world recognizes the tremendous work that our farmers and ranchers have done over the years and you know they come here in droves just to take advantage of that."

Federal Agricultural Minister Gerry Ritz spoke at the
Canadian Western Agribition on Friday, Nov. 25, 2011.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post
When asked about the importance of traceability, Ritz said improving the system is a top priority.

"Whether you’re marketing overseas when they want to know where their food’s coming from and be able to tell their consumers that or tracing out disease, you can’t beat a good traceability system.

"Working with the industry, we feel we’ve got some 90 per cent of the system industry covered at this point. Now it’s a matter of making sure we have a database that’s up to the job of collecting all that information and having it available at the touch of a button."

Marty Seymour, left, CEO and general manager of the Canadian
Western Agribition, and Gerry Ritz, Federal Agricultural
Minister, tour the barns at the Canadian Western Agribition
on Friday, Nov. 25, 2011.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post


Marty Seymour, Agribition's CEO and general manager on the announcement: "Well Agribirtoin’s very excited about it. The federal government’s been very supportive of our event. It’s a great partnership we have. It goes a long way to helping us keep Agribition on the international stage."

Leader-Post: People and size big draws at Agribition for U.K. visitors

International visitors (from left) John Barlow of Langshire,
England, Richard Priestley of Yorkshire and Ellis Mutch
of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, view some cattle at Agribition
 on Thursday.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Leader-Post, Leader-Post


What stood out at Agribition for a group of young visitors from the United Kingdom is how welcoming everybody is and how big everything is.


Read more





International visitors (left to right) John Barlow of Langshire,
Richard Priestley of Yorkshire, and Ellis Mutch of Scotland
view some cattle on the grounds during the Canadian
Western Agribition in Regina November 24, 2011.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Regina Leader-Post

Additional and full-length comments


"We’d definitely come back again," said 21-year-old John Barlow. "It’s definitely a place you’d come back to."







International visitors (left to right) John Barlow
 of Langshire, Richard Priestley of Yorkshire,
and Ellis Mutch of Scotland view some cattle
on the grounds during the Canadian Western
Agribition in Regina November 24, 2011.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Regina Leader-Post








"My favourite part about being here is the people. You walk around. You talk to people. You’re always learning and as you come back year after year, everyone’s so friendly. I’ve made great friends here. That’s why I keep coming back," said the group's chaperone Jim Barber



Friday, November 25, 2011

Leader-Post: Livestock identification tags ensure cattle and food safety

Brian Anderson of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency
checks a bull using the latest in ear tag technology.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Leader-Post, Leader-Post
Unique animal data - like age, weight and other vital statistics - can be obtained instantly through identification tags demonstrated at Agribition on Thursday.

Read more







Traceability Q & A - from the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency

"Q: What is Canadian Cattle Identification Agency?

The Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) is a not-for-profit, industry-led organization incorporated to establish a national cattle identification program to promote beef consumption through the assurance of efficient trace back and containment of serious animal health and food safety concerns in the Canadian cattle herd.

The agency is led by a Board of Directors made up of representatives from all sectors of the cattle industry.

Q: What is livestock traceability?

Traceability is the ability to follow an item or a group of items - be it animal, plant, food product or ingredient - from one point in the supply chain to another, either backwards or forwards.

Livestock traceability systems are based upon three basic elements: animal identification; premises identification; and animal movement.

Q: What does a fully functional traceability system involve?

A fully functional traceability system is based on three pillars:

        1. Animal identification – Associating a unique animal identification number to a   location and time

        2. Premises identification – Providing a unique animal identification number to a location and time

        3. Movement – Associating the animal identification number with a premises and time

In order to track movement, a premises identification number (PID) is required. With the goal of facilitating a fully functional traceability system, the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) encourages producers to obtain a PID number by recording the legal land description (LLD) of their primary premises (home quarter or operation) in the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS) at www.clia.livestockid.ca.

Q: Why is livestock traceability important to Canadians?

Traceability systems are important, effective tools that can be used for many things, including the protection of animal health, public health and food safety.

They can help reduce response time, thereby limiting economic, environmental and social impacts of emergency situations such as disease outbreaks.

Canada’s traceability system aims to ensure the consumer retains their confidence in the products being offered – benefiting all aspects of the meat and livestock industry.

Q: How does the traceability system work?

 A CCIA-approved radio frequency identification (RFID) tag is applied to the animal’s ear prior to leaving the herd of origin;

All RFID tags are visually and electronically imbedded with a unique identification number that is allocated from the national database and then distributed to producers through authorized tag dealers;

The national RFID tag distribution network securely reports all tag issuance records directly to the national database;

The unique number of each individual animal is maintained to the point of export or carcass inspection where the animal is either approved for human consumption or condemned.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) provides full regulatory enforcement for animal identification as defined in the Health of Animals Regulations. All herd of origin information associated with each tag number is maintained within the national database and is only accessed by authorized CFIA personnel in the event of an animal health issue.

Q: How does RFID tag technology work?

Each ear tag is a transponder, which consists of an encoded chip and antenna.
A reader transfers electromagnetic waves, charging the transponder.

The transponder then transmits data to the reader and the reader receives the response from the transponder.

RFID tags are designed to function without battery power.

They have the capacity to perform for the lifetime of the animal.

Q: What are the benefits of using RFID tag technology?

The benefits of using RFID tag technology include: exceptional tag retention and readability, increased data integrity, ability to read at a distance without line of sight, and future capabilities of full animal movement tracking.

Q: How does a CCIA-approved RFID tag support the agricultural industry? What kind of data can be associated with a RFID tag?

A RFID ear tag can be linked to an abundance of data unique to that animal, such as:
        o Birth date / Age verification
        o Herd of origin
        o Movement from one premises destination to another
        o Vaccinations and/or antibiotics
        o Date and method of castration and dehorning
        o Weaning date and weights
        o Specific information on breed/cross
        o Dam and sire information
        o Feed type and amount
        o Import/export details

The Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS) database is designed to store all of this data. Today, there are many software options available to customize the management of this important data – supporting livestock operators to make good business decisions and optimize herd genetics, health and production management protocols.

Q: What is premises identification?

Premises identification is the assignment of a randomly generated, unique identification number to a physical land location referred to as a premises location allocator identification number or premises identification number (PLA ID or PID).

Q: Why is premises identification important to producers?

Premises identification benefits producers by supporting: Response to natural disaster emergencies like tornadoes, floods, fires, etc.;

Tracing of animals to manage an animal disease outbreak; Disease control measures for animal health issues when more than one livestock species is affected;

Rapid notification of producers in affected areas of disease threats or control measures;

Quick coordination of sites for carcass disposal in the event of an animal disease outbreak;

Dispatch of emergency resources to appropriate targeted locations to contain and assist with disease outbreaks; and

The return to business and limiting losses after animal disease outbreak.

Q: How do I register my premises / acquire a PID?

It’s quick and easy to get a PLA ID/PID number – you can:
1. Contact CCIA with your LLD toll-free at 1-877-909-BEEF (2333),


2. Email your LLD to info@canadaid.ca or

3. Generate it yourself in three clicks after logging your CLTS account: Select My Account, Premises, then Register Premises and fill in the required fields."

www.canadaid.ca

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Leader-Post: Agri-Ed celebrates 25 years

Lyle Benko took his son Dean to Agribition when Dean was in kindergarten and now Dean is bringing his son, Andrew who is in kindergarten, on Saturday.

Read more

Three year old Tyler Popadynek watches the new born chicks in the Agri-Ed
showcase during the Western Canadian Agribition in Regina Nov. 22, 2011.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Regina Leader-Post

Full quotes and comments


Lyle Benko: "I worked at the stockyards when I was a kid and I got a real appreciation for the rural setting that I didn’t understand because I grew up in the city.

"From then on, I always believed as an educator the fact that our kids really don’t understand a lot about where the food comes from, a lot about the appreciation of how hard it is to get that food to us.

"I guess I thought a long time ago that if I ever could have a chance, I’d do something about it and that’s what we’ve been doing."



Tasha Epp with the Sheep development board spins wool
for children at the Agri-Ed showcase during the Western
Canadian Agribition in Regina Nov. 22, 2011.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Regina Leader-Post

Tasha Epp: "(Kids will) stand and stare at it forever and try and figure out how it works.

It’s just very interesting to see because I’m sure none of them have ever seen it before and it’s nice to see that they get to view things that they may not see in the city system."



Courtney MacDougall: "This year, we introduced our grade one’s and two programs so they are able to come and as well we’ve been able to provide a half-day experience for some kids.

"I think the reason was if bringing half-day students in, you can actually do a lot, depending and it opens up time frames that weren’t there before. Even though it’s a small amount of time...it’s allowing them to get that experience and I think it’s important that you start giving the agriculture experience to the youngest because as they grow, they’re only going to become more educated on it and if they’re really inteterssed in it, those are our future mentors and agri-business people."

Leader-Post: Provincial funding announced for Canadian beef research

 A beef genetics research project is receiving $375,000 from the provincial government, Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Bob Bjornerud announced at Agribition on Wednesday.

Read more


Additional comments from Rick McIntyre, a cattleman from Churchbridge and past president of the Canadian Simmental Association

McIntyre said the Canadian Simmental Association became the leader of this project because of seed money given to the association by one of its members.

"We were able to come up front with our own money to kick start the whole thing," said McIntyre. "Our members have made significant contributions to the start of the projects."

He said the research project will target specific segments of DNA.


"We’re going to be looking for genomically-enhanced EPDs (expected progeny differences) that will, in short, allow us as breeders to identify superior genetics at a younger age," said McIntyre.

Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Bob Bjornerud announced
on Wednesday that the provincial government will provide
$375,000 to the Enhancing Canadian Beef Production through
Genomic Innovation project.

Photograph by: Roy Antal, Regina Leader-Post files


"They do some genomic mapping of our total DNA respective over our whole pedigree and through the data we have built and through the data that’s going to be gathered in this project, they’re going to identify animals through DNA snips that have the genes we want to select for."





Additional comments from Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Bob Bjornerud

"(The project) just improves the genetic breeding of the cattle and you know, when you put them in a feed lot, if you can cut it back by a couple of weeks, even, in the feeding process, it makes more dollars for everybody concerned," said Bjornerud.

"That’s really what it’s all about: a better product, but also at the same time brings efficiencies to the raising and the feeding of the cattle."

Bjornerud said he has met with several foreign delegations during his Agribition visit.

"We met a Ukrainian delegation (Tuesday) morning and everybody’s a lot more optimistic than they were even a couple years ago. Right around the world it’s surprising," said Bjornerud.

He said the Ukrainian delegation was mostly looking for machinery.

“I was amazed at the size of the farms that they have there in the Ukraine and some of the machinery that they’re looking at and they’re growing over there. Their farms are getting bigger just as they are here," said Bjornerud.

"We have a lot of similarities with them and they were just a good group to have over here picking tires and taking a look at the livestock that we have and things like that," he said.

He added that he met with some Americans as well.

"We met with a number of the American cattle associations (Tuesday) and there’s more optimism down there and they’ve got some dry areas down there in Texas, but the guys that we met yesterday are pretty optimistic,” said Bjornerud.

Bjornerud said that while talking to the group from the U.S., the country of origin labeling wasn’t a major issue and never was.

"I think part of the problem was nobody paid all that much attention down there to some of the things down that were going on," said Bjornerud. "These meetings were important when we can put across our point about how it hurt our industry up here and I think they realized then that maybe it wasn’t such a great idea after all."

Wednesday was Bjornerud’s third day at Agribition and he said he thinks it will be a good week for attendance.

"I think Mother Nature’s been the best thing we’ve had going for us outside of these walls. It’s been just great out there," said Bjornerud. "They started off the beginning of the week with the younger generation with the rodeo and that and I think that was a real plus this year.

"That’s even good, but I think the crowds by the end of the week are really going to be good."

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Leader-Post: New First Nations pavilion opens at Agribition

The Cree Spirit drum group plays during the opening
of the first-ever First Nations pavilion at the Canadian
Western Agribition on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post
Twelve years ago, Elmer Eashappie had a vision of including First Nations in Agribition and this year, his dream became a reality.

Read more


Additional comments from Glen Pratt, chief of George Gordon First Nation 

“Young people are obviously our future," said Pratt. "It’s important that our young people have that ability to see the whole world, that they’re not just confined to their First Nation, that in fact they themselves can become a part of the Agribitiion as a participant and also just to learn more about what Agribition is about, what the way of life is for farmers and ranchers and so on.”


The Cree Spirit drum group plays during the opening
of the first-ever First Nations pavilion at the Canadian
Western Agribition on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post

Comments from Perry Bellegarde, chief of Little Black Bear First Nation

Bellegarde said the First Nations people are involved in many sectors in Saskatchewan and Canada and education increases awareness, which can lead to action and relationship building.

“Having a First Nation pavilion, it tells not only ourselves, but the Agribition team, people in Saskatchewan that First Nations are part of this sector as well,” said Bellegarde. “We need to be a part of every sector that’s operating in this economy that deals with poverty and unemployment and everything else.”

Leader-Post: Two Regina teachers burn the Agribition brand

Agribition special guests, teachers Deb Bresciani (left) and
Joanna Lukomski, perform the burning of the brand at
Canadian Western Agribition in Regina on Nov. 21, 2011.

Photograph by: Bryan Schlosser, Regina Leader-Post
Deb Bresciani has brought her classes to Agribition for more than 20 years because of her love for agriculture.

Read more


Deb Bresciani's thoughts on performing the Burning the Brand ceremony

“It was really exciting for both of us. (It was a) very prestigious thing to do because we know it’s held in high honour because of dignitaries,” said Bresciani. “It was just kind of a neat connection from what I do here as a teacher and then passing on the torch to Joanna.”


Joanna Lukomski's thoughts on performing the ceremony and her favourite part about Agribition when she was younger

“It was very nerve racking," said Lukomski while describing what it was like to perform the ceremony. "I was really hoping that I did a good job and was kind of wondering how long to hold the brand on.”

Lukomski said she owes Bresciani for first getting her involved in Agribition.

"(Bresciani) basically introduced me to Agribition and agriculture and Saskatchewan’s resources,” said Lukomski. “It was really significant to me. It was passing on the torch figuratively and symbolically.

"So it was a really nice experience and being able to do it with Deb was a great way to show how thankful I am that she was able to take me here 12 years ago."

When she first visited Agribition, Lukomski said she enjoyed all of the animals.

“My favourite parts were just petting the animals and seeing them up close and because of Deb, I was able to go to things like horse back riding and really get involved with agriculture more,” said Lukomski. “When you’re a city kid, you don’t really get to see those aspects and it was really nice.”

Monday, November 21, 2011

Leader-Post: 'Not just about the cows': Agribition seeks to attract wide range of patrons

Darren Dunits, left, from Claresholm, Alta. and Kyle Langmaier
 from Regina pitch wood shavings in the cattle barns as setup
continued for Canadian Western Agribition in Regina on Friday.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post



The new head of the Canadian Western Agribition (CWA) said Agribition will offer something for everyone.

Read more



Canadian Western Agribition home




Agribition Grounds Map

(Source: Canadian Western Agribition website)
 Full Schedule of Events, Agribition 2011, courtesy of Canadian Western Agribition website

Monday - November 21, 2011

08:00 AM High School Rodeo Brandt Centre
08:00 AM Canadian National 4H & Youth Judging Competition Stockman's Arena
09:00 AM Goat Shows Barn 4
10:00 AM Commercial Trade Show Exhibits Open 
10:00 AM Story Telling in Teepee Arena 3
10:30 AM Dancing Young Buffalo Drum Group Arena 3
10:30 AM Burning of the Brand Brandt Centre
10:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
11:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
12:00 PM Canadian National 4H & Youth Judging Competition Stadium
12:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:30 PM Dancing Young Buffalo Drum Group Arena 3
01:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
02:00 PM Story Telling in Teepee Arena 3
07:00 PM High School Rodeo Brandt Centre 
 


Tuesday - November 22, 2011 

08:30 AM Stock Dog CWA International Championship Trials Brandt Centre
09:00 AM Goat Show and Sale Barn 4
10:00 AM Commercial Trade Show Exhibits Open 
10:00 AM First Nations Pavilion Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Arena 3
10:00 AM Youth Showmanship Competition Canada Centre Arena
10:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
11:00 AM First Lady Classic Futurity Stadium
11:00 AM Bison Sale, Canadian National Stockman's Arena
11:30 AM Youth Team Grooming Competition Canada Centre Arena
11:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
12:00 PM Noon Hour Entertainment - Draft Horse Hitch Demo and Mini Chuckwagon Racing Brandt Centre
12:00 PM First Lady Classic Stadium
12:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:00 PM Stock Dog CWA International Championship Trials Brandt Centre
01:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:40 PM Story Telling in Teepee Arena 3
02:30 PM Kirk Stierwalt - Cattle Fitting Demo Canada Centre Arena
06:00 PM Winners Circle - Reception, Horse Pull Sponsor Auction, Auctioneer Competition Stadium
07:00 PM CCA Finals Rodeo - Including Stock Dog Finals Brandt Centre 
 


Wednesday - November 23, 2011

09:00 AM Simmental Show Stadium East
09:00 AM Speckle Park Show Stadium West
09:30 AM Kirk Stierwalt - Cattle Fitting Demo Canada Centre Arena
10:00 AM Commercial Trade Show Exhibits Open 
10:30 AM Horse Pulls, Lightweight Division Brandt Centre
10:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
11:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
12:00 PM Noon Hour Entertainment - Draft Horse Hitch Demo and Mini Chuckwagon Racing Brandt Centre
12:00 PM Gelbvieh Show Stadium West
12:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:00 PM Angus Masterpiece Sale Auditorium
01:30 PM Horse Pulls, Middleweight Division Brandt Centre
01:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
02:00 PM Story Telling in Teepee Arena 3
05:00 PM Speckle Park Sale Auditorium
07:00 PM CCA Finals Rodeo Brandt Centre 
 


Thursday - November 24, 2011

Start Time Event Location 
07:00 AM Team Cattle Penning Brandt Centre
09:00 AM Black Angus Show Stadium East
09:00 AM Red Angus Show Stadium West
10:00 AM Commercial Trade Show Exhibits Open 
10:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
11:30 AM Gelbvieh Sale Auditorium
11:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
12:00 PM Noon Hour Entertainment - Draft Horse Hitch Demo and Mini Chuckwagon Racing Brandt Centre
12:30 PM Simmental Sale Auditorium
12:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:30 PM Horse Pulls, Heavyweight Division Brandt Centre
01:30 PM Shorthorn Ringmaster's Choice Canada Centre Arena
01:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:40 PM Story Telling in Teepee Arena 3
02:30 PM Shorthorn Sale Canada Centre Arena
02:30 PM Limousin Show Stadium West
03:00 PM Charolais Sale Auditorium
03:30 PM Ranch Horse Demo Brandt Centre
04:00 PM Sheep Show Barn 5
05:00 PM Hereford Sale , National Auditorium
07:00 PM CCA Finals Rodeo Brandt Centre 
 


Friday - November 25, 2011

08:00 AM Hereford Show, National Polled and Horned Stadium East
09:00 AM Canada's Premier Select Ranch Horse Competition Brandt Centre
09:00 AM Shorthorn Show Stadium West
09:00 AM Commercial Cattle, Heifer Alley and Bull Pen Alley Shows Stockman's Arena
10:00 AM Commercial Trade Show Exhibits Open 
10:00 AM Katahdin Sheep Open Show, National Show Barn 4
10:30 AM Dancing Young Buffalo Drum Group Arena 3
10:30 AM Prospect Horse Previews - 2 & 3 year olds Brandt Centre
10:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
11:30 AM Story Telling in Teepee Arena 3
11:30 AM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
12:00 PM Noon Hour Entertainment - Draft Horse Hitch Demo and Mini Chuckwagon Racing Brandt Centre
12:00 PM Maine Anjou Show Canada Centre Arena
12:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:30 PM Limousin Sale Auditorium
01:30 PM Charolais Show Stadium West
01:30 PM Milking Demonstration - Dairy Display Stockman's Arena
01:45 PM Dancing Young Buffalo Drum Group Arena 3
02:30 PM SSBA Sheep Show Barn 4
02:30 PM Canada's Premier Select Ranch Horse and Prospect Sale Brandt Centre
03:00 PM Shorthorn Plus Show Canada Centre Arena
05:00 PM Hereford Red Coat Classic Auditorium
07:00 PM CCA Finals Rodeo Brandt Centre
07:00 PM Angus Sale Power and Perfection Canada Centre Arena 
 


Saturday - November 26, 2011

07:00 AM Team Cattle Penning Brandt Centre
09:00 AM Prospect Steer & Heifer Show Auditorium
09:00 AM Junior Beef Extreme, Canadian Stadium
10:00 AM Commercial Trade Show Exhibits Open 
10:00 AM Sheep Show, SSBA Barn 4
10:00 AM Commercial Cattle Sale Stockman's Arena
10:30 AM Dancing Young Buffalo Drum Group Arena 3
12:00 PM SSBA Sheep Sale Barn 4
12:00 PM Noon Hour Entertainment - Draft Horse Hitch Demo and Mini Chuckwagon Racing Brandt Centre
01:00 PM Prospect Steer & Heifer Sale Auditorium
01:45 PM Dancing Young Buffalo Drum Group Arena 3
02:30 PM Katahdin Sheep Sale Barn 4
02:30 PM Team Cattle Penning Finals Brandt Centre
04:00 PM RBC Beef Supreme Challenge Stadium
07:00 PM CCA Finals Rodeo Brandt Centre
08:00 PM Tailgate Party Stadium

Leader-Post: Annual Christmas kettle campaign kicks off in Regina

Saskatchewan Roughrider Marc Parenteau (left) puts the first
donation in the Salvation Army Christmas Kettle as Major Doug
Binner (right) shares a laugh with him during the army's annual kettle
launch held at the Northgate Mall in Regina on Nov. 18, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post


Holiday tunes echoed in the Northgate Mall Centre Court on Friday morning as the Salvation Army’s 2011 Christmas Kettle campaign kicked off.

Read more










Additional comment from Major Doug Binner on this year's goal

 "We’re hoping that we’ll be able to meet every need that’s presented to us," said Binner.


Alison Lohans (left) with the Queen City Brass
Band plays her cornet during the Salvation Army's
 annual kettle launch held at the Northgate Mall in
Regina on Nov 18, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post

Major Doug Binner (right) with the Salvation Army directs the Queen City Brass Band during the army's annual kettle launch held at the Northgate Mall in Regina on Nov 18, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post



Leader-Post: No injuries in Regina house fire

An adult and a child escaped uninjured after their house caught fire Thursday morning.

Read more

A young boy watches as the Regina Fire Department packs up hoses after a house
fire at 2035 Wallace Street in Regina on Nov 17, 2011. An adult and child were home at
the time of the fire and got out of the house unharmed. The fire is under investigation.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post


Leader-Post: Teen missing from Kamsack group home

A 15-year-old boy went missing Tuesday and the Kamsack RCMP are asking for the public's help.

Read more

Leader-Post: Occupy Regina camp torn down by police

Glen Davies, City Manager for the City of Regina, speaks
to journalists about taking down Occupy Regina site on
Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2011.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post



All that remained of the Occupy Regina camp Wednesday was an iPod lying in the snow and circles of green grass showing where the tents once sat in snow-covered Victoria Park.

Read more






Full quote from Glen Davies, city manager for the City of Regina, on why he believed no one was present when the Occupy Regina camp was torn down

"(It was) an indication, I think, that people have been co-operating in terms of slowing removing themselves from the site," said Davies.

"I said last Thursday that we would start off quietly and start using ticketing as a means to start moving folks out of the site. I didn’t indicate when, but I did indicate we’d explore other means. My concern was that the weather is closing in significantly," said Davies.

"The tents presented a potential health and safety issue for the occupants," he said. "My concern was in letting it go on at -20 degree temperatures, we were likely to see health and safety issues escalate."

“The cold was becoming obviously an issue for occupants in tents that are meant to be used in the summer weather,” said Davies. “It’s obvious people have been having open fires in the tents. The tents had cardboard floors. They were nylon tents.

"So the combination of cold weather, all of that and open flames was not something that we thought we should see go on.”

Leader-Post: RCMP search for missing Fort Qu'Appelle teen

Leslie Whitebear, 17, hasn’t been seen since running
away from the Echo Valley Youth Centre on Tuesday.

Photograph by: RCMP, handout photo




A 17-year-old male went missing from Fort Qu’Appelle on Tuesday.

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Leader-Post: School bus and semi collide in Yorkton

No one was seriously injured after a collision Wednesday morning between a school bus carrying one child and a semi-trailer unit in Yorkton.

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Friday, November 18, 2011

Leader-Post: Regina occupiers fined

Protester David Jerome holds up a ticket to appear in court.

Photograph by: Troy Fleece, Regina Leader-Post




The City of Regina plans to continue issuing tickets to Occupy Regina protesters if they don't leave their camp in Victoria Park overnight.

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SaskBoy's Abandoned Stuff blog
 - includes extra information and a video with a transcript




Occupy Regina Fined video (source: SaskBoy's blog)

Leader-Post: SGI blitz to focus on cellphone use while driving

During this week’s Operation HandsFree blitz, police
across Saskatchewan will be keeping an eye out for
drivers talking or texting while on the road.

Photograph by: Chris Roussakis, REUTERS




Saskatchewan police will be watching even closer for people talking on the phone or texting while driving on Thursday and Friday.

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Leader-Post: Drivers urged to slow down when passing emergency vehicles

Moose Jaw and District EMS paramedic Ray Francis will never forget when an ambulance was struck by a vehicle on the Trans-Canada Highway between Pense and Belle Plaine.

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Ray Francis' full quote describing one accident

"A towing company was attempting to pull a car out of the ditch on a snowy, somewhat stormy day and they were protecting the scene so the tow truck drivers wouldn’t get injured or get run into by other vehicles.
"So they had their marked vehicle on the trans Canada highway and a vehicle ran right into the back of them so they had all their emergency warning lights on and the vehicle still managed to run into the back of them.
"They did have minor injuries although recently just talking to the officers they’re still suffering some pain in their neck and back as a result of that crash and what we’re seeing with that is that’s one instance where somebody got hit and actually got injured, but we’re seeing, especially in the wintertime, quite often we’re seeing instances where vehicles are passing us by at high rates of speed and not pulling over to the farthest lane away from the situation.
"They’re just not afraid to drive the regular speed limit or even faster, whizzing within a few feet of our vehicles and causing quite a lot of concern for our paramedics that are on scene. I’ve had many of them call in saying that they’re afraid for their safety while they’re on scene."
 - Ray Francis, Moose Jaw and District EMS paramedic and director of communications for the Moose Jaw  EMS

Leader-Post: No tickets issued at Occupy Regina


While the City of Regina gave Occupy Regina protesters a deadline of Saturday to leave the park, no tickets were issued as of late Monday.

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Additional comments

"I honestly think that the best that could come of this is that people in Saskatchewan, our policy makers start taking homelessness seriously because it’s a rampant problem in Regina," said Jeff Knievel, an Occupy Regina protester who hasn't been sleeping overnight.

He added that rent continues to increase.


Despite giving Occupy Regina protesters eviction notices
last week, the city has yet to issue any tickets.

Photograph by: Michael Bell, Regina Leader-Post files



"I think that (the city is) genuinely concerned about people’s safety this winter. I mean, I don’t want to camp outside in the winter time and I think it’s dangerous in Saskatchewan, but there are people who have no choice," said Knievel. "I respect the rights of those who want to voluntarily put themselves in someone else’s position and assume the risks that come along with it.

"If some kind of government is willing to make a stand and start doing something in the way of actually solving the homelessness problem in Saskatchewan instead of just the problem I would say yeah, our movement is done. We can go away."

Leader-Post: City wants protesters out


Tyson Ledoux, 20 years with Occupy Regina was served
an eviction notice by a City of Regina bylaw officer at
Victoria Park on Nov. 10, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post





The City of Regina gave the Occupy Regina protesters a deadline of 8 a.m. this morning to pack up their camp.


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More photos

 

City of Regina manager of bylaw enforcement Dwayne Flaman
(left) and city manager Glen Davies during the City of Regina
news conference announcing that an eviction notice for
campers with Occupy Regina would be in force this Saturday
but not enforced until Monday. Photo taken in Regina on
Nov. 10, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post

 

A security guard at Regina City Hall keeps Occupy Regina
protester Billy Patterson from attending the City of
Regina news conference announcing that an eviction notice
for campers with Occupy Regina would be in force this
Saturday but not enforced until Monday. Photo taken in
Regina on Nov. 10, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post

Leader-Post: Occupy Regina protesters rally at city hall, say they have no intention of leaving


Protesters at an Occupy Regina rally at City Hall courtyard
in Regina on Nov. 9, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post



While asked to leave voluntarily by City of Regina officials, Occupy Regina protesters have no intention of going anywhere.

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Billy Patterson speaks out at an Occupy Regina rally at
City Hall courtyard in Regina on Nov. 9, 2011.

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Leader-Post: HEROES program builds youth self-esteem

Murray and Shannon Lutzer, volunteers for the Impact
Society, a group that helps teens.

Photography by: Bryan Schlosser, Regina Leader-Post
Robb Nash was only 17 years old when he should have died.

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Impact Society website

Robb Nash Official website (and introductory video)

Robb Nash - Facebook


Robb Nash on his inspirations for getting involved:

"It started off with one simple phone call when I decided that I wanted to do something special with my life and my first gut instinct - we all have that voice inside of us - my first gut instinct was to find the semi driver, phone him and tell him that I made it, that I survived and I was able to contact him.I got his number from the police.

"When I phoned him, he had still thought I was dead from the accident and he was in therapy. He was a psychologist. He was on medication for depression because of what happened. The accident wasn't his fault. It was our fault, but there was this cloud over top of him because he saw his semi had run me over. He killed me.

"You could feel his cloud dissipate when he found out I was okay, that I survived and after that I hung up the phone and I thought, 'I want to do more of this and I want others to get the feeling of what it's like to live your life for others and doing things for other people."

Further explanation from Murray Lutzer on the bottle of water example used in class:

"We have three walls that we put around the gifts and abilities that actually fit around the water, which is great because it shows yeah, ok, you can't see the gifts and abilities anymore because it's up by a wall, a wall we have created because of our circumstances or our fears or the words people have given us," said Lutzer. "We really encourage the kids to explore what their wall is and they're the only ones that can take it down. We can only take them so far."

Leader-Post: Occupy Regina protesters asked to pack up camp


Kim Procter of Regina at the Occupy Regina camp at
Victoria Park on Nov. 8, 2011

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post





The City of Regina has officially asked Occupy Regina protesters to shut down their camp.

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Jon-Li Gopheri of Regina at the Occupy Regina camp at
Victoria Park on Nov. 8, 2011

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post

Chris Henri of Regina at the Occupy Regina camp at
Victoria Park on Nov. 8, 2011

Photograph by: Don Healy, Regina Leader-Post